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Corneal Physician Bulletin: Non-Invasive Imaging Technique May Aid in Earlier Diagnosis of Sjogren's

In vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM) may be useful in helping to detect corneal nerve changes associated with Sjögren’s Syndrome (SS), allowing for early diagnosis and the consideration of new treatments, reported a study in Ocular Surface.1

Specifically, corneal sensitivity, which was assessed using the Cochet-Bonnet aesthesiometer, was significantly decreased in the SS group versus a control group and group of patients who had meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD). Additionally, the number of inflammatory cells was significantly increased in the SS group versus the control group, the subbasal nerve plexus density was significantly decreased in the SS group versus both the control and MGD groups, and the tortuosity of the nerves in the SS group was significantly increased versus the control and MGD groups. Further, the average number of subbasal nerve plexus neuromas was significantly increased in the SS group vs. the control group, with a significant increase in the average number of neuromas in SS patients who had associated small fiber neuropathy (SFN) vs. SS patients without SFN.

The study was comprised of 71 SS patients, including 19 with linked SFN, 20 healthy volunteers, and 20 MGD patients. IVCM was employed to study subbasal nerve plexus density and morphology.

Reference

1. Ocul Surf. 2022 Jul;25:155-162.